Category Archives: Art in City Streets

Public Art at Christmas Time (Part 1)

Quoted from quotegarden.com

Instead of being a time of unusual behavior, Christmas is perhaps the only time in the year when people can obey their natural impulses and express their true sentiments without feeling self-conscious and, perhaps, foolish.  Christmas, in short, is about the only chance a man has to be himself. ~Francis C. Farley

[I]t is the one season of the year when we can lay aside all gnawing worry, indulge in sentiment without censure, assume the carefree faith of childhood, and just plain “have fun.”  Whether they call it Yuletide, Noel, Weinachten, or Christmas, people around the earth thirst for its refreshment as the desert traveller for the oasis. ~D.D. Monroe

Christmas, children, is not a date.  It is a state of mind. ~Mary Ellen Chase

Somehow, not only for Christmas
But all the long year through,
The joy that you give to others
Is the joy that comes back to you.
And the more you spend in blessing
The poor and lonely and sad,
The more of your heart’s possessing
Returns to you glad.

-John Greenleaf Whittier

We Heart Public Art wishes everyone a Merry Christmas and a Blessed New Year!

Bust of Dr. Lincoln Goodale (taken by jfsl3 in Columbus, Ohio, USA, 2005)

Statue of Captain James Cook (taken by werewegian in Yorkshire, UK, 2007)

Festive Hippo (taken by Helena Pugsley in Marwell Zoo,  Colden Common, UK, 2008)

A Statue in Savannah, Georgia (taken by jamieca, 2006)

Lion with a Wreath (taken by {elaine} in Chicago. USA, 2007)

Ibsen with a Santa Hat (taken by svanes, Grimstad, Norway, 2006)

An Angel with a Santa Hat (taken by kerryank in Adelaide, Australia, 2008)

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Displays and Decorations: Winter Holidays

From quotegarden.com:

Until one feels the spirit of Christmas, there is no Christmas. All else is outward display–so much tinsel and decorations. For it isn’t the holly, it isn’t the snow. It isn’t the tree not the firelight’s glow. It’s the warmth that comes to the hearts of men when the Christmas spirit returns again. – Author Unknown

The Supreme Court has ruled that they cannot have a nativity scene in Washington, DC.  This wasn’t for any religious reasons.  They couldn’t find three wise men and a virgin. -Jay Leno

Perhaps the best Yuletide decoration is being wreathed in smiles. -Author Unknown

photo sharing (respect artist's copyrights)

Peas on Earth (taken by pleaseknock in Bondi, Australia 2007)

Giant Christmas Ornaments (taken by uzvards in San Francisco, USA, 2005)

Menorah Display for Hannukah: taken by hyagain at the Germantown Jewish Center, Philadelphia, USA, 2003

Now all we need is a giant socket… (Taken by megan duffy in NYC, USA 2007)

All wrapped up (taken by ichico in Tokyo, Japan 2006)

photo sharing (respect artist's copyrights)

Giant Christmas Lantern (taken by bikoy in Pampanga, Philippines, 2007)

Huge Festive Decors (taken by Kalle Anka in London, UK, 2008)

Ice and Snow Sculptures (Part 2)

Quoted from wikipedia:

Sculpting ice presents a number of difficulties due to the variability and volatility of the material. Ice must be carefully selected to be suitable for the sculptor’s purposes and should be free of undesired impurities. Typically, ideal carving ice is made from pure, clean water. However, clear, transparent ice is a result of the freezing process and not necessarily related to the purity of the water. Clear ice is mostly the result of slow freezing that allows impurities to escape. The water molecules are allowed to line up into the typical crystal lattice while impurities remain in the unfrozen water. Certain machines and processes allow for slow freezing and the removal of impurities and therefore are able to produce the clear blocks of ice that are favored by ice carvers. However, not all blocks that are carved are clear ice. White ice blocks look like snow and are sometimes carved. Colored ice blocks are produced by adding dyes to the ice and can be carved as well. In some instances, clear ice and colored ice are combined to create a desired effect.

Frozen in thought: Ice sculpture entry for Zehnder’s Snowfest, Frankenmuth, Michigan USA (taken in Jan. 2008 by David :0)

Detail of ice sculpture of child: Halifax Ice Sculpture Trail, Nova Scotia, Canada (taken in Dec. 2008 by john2544)

Ice Queen: from Wereldwonderen, Netherlands (taken in Dec. 2007 by Eisbeertje)

Cold Icy Stare: Exposición de Esculturas de Hielo in Madrid, Spain (taken in Dec. 2007 by tonymadrid)

Royal Icy Treatment: Ice Sculpture Festival and Trail, Norwich, Norfolk, UK (taken in Dec. 2005 by Leo Reynolds)

Ice Fantasy: International Competition of Ice and Sculpture in Khabarovsk, Russia (taken in Jan. 2008 by smakogon)

Street Art: Christmas (Part 2)

Quoted from wikipedia:

“The motivations and objectives that drive street artists are as varied as the artists themselves. There is a strong current of activism and subversion in urban art. Street art can be a powerful platform for reaching the public, and frequent themes include adbusting, subvertising and other culture jamming, the abolition of private property and reclaiming the streets. Other street artists simply see urban space as an untapped format for personal artwork, while others may appreciate the challenges and risks that are associated with installing illicit artwork in public places. However the universal theme in most, if not all street art, is that adapting visual artwork into a format which utilizes public space, allows artists who may otherwise feel disenfranchised, to reach a much broader audience than traditional artwork and galleries normally allow.”

Graffiti Christmas tree with “toy” ornaments: taken in St. Petersburg, Russia in June, 2008 (originally uploaded by быдло-метро трэш-мажор)

Merry Fishmast:” taken in Locarno, Switzerland in 2006 (originally uploaded by angora frog)

Winter in America:” by Chris Stain, taken in Norway (?), September 2008 (Originally uploaded by Romanywg)

Darth, I am Your Father” by eye, taken in Cardiff, Wales, UK, Nov. 2008 (Originally uploaded by Thiefree)

Santa’s Ghetto: Found on the security barrier or ‘apartheid wall’ in Bethlehem, West Bank, Palestine, this graffiti art is from Italian street artist, Blu (photo taken in Dec. 2007 and originally uploaded by eddiedangerous )

Endangered Peace Dove: An original Banksy, well-renowned street artist, also found in Bethlehem, West Bank, Palestine (photo taken in May 2008 and originally uploaded by hazy jenius ); Note: for a news report on this, click here

Street Art: Christmas (Part 1)

Quoted from wikipedia:

Street art is any art developed in public spaces — that is, “in the streets” — though the term usually refers to art of an illicit nature, as opposed to government sponsored initiatives. The term can include traditional graffiti artwork, stencil graffiti, sticker art, wheatpasting and street poster art, video projection, art intervention, guerrilla art, flash mobbing and street installations. Typically, the term Street Art or the more specific Post-Graffiti is used to distinguish contemporary public-space artwork from territorial graffiti, vandalism, and corporate art.

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Subway Greeting: Shot taken in London, UK (2006); Originally uploaded by daveknapik

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Tough Santa: pic taken in Montreal, Canada, 2008 (originally uploaded by Christian et Cie)

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Sneaking Elfvis: part of a series of graffiti art found in the streets of Auckland, New Zealand, 2007 (originally uploaded by Robyn Gallagher)

Holiday Satire: a stenciled message taken in Norwich, UK, Dec. 2007 (originally uploaded by Simon_K)

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Elf by street artist Box. (taken in Jan. 2008 in Bristol, UK; originally uploaded by Box.)

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Wheatpasted art by street artist Kriebel (taken in Dec. 2007 in London, UK; originally uploaded by Kriebel)

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Statement on Consumerism: taken in Jan. 2008, somewhere in Canada (originally uploaded by sin against nature)


Judenplatz Holocaust Memorial (aka The Nameless Library)


Flickr pic originally uploaded by Sarah Kernohan

Location: Judenplatz, Vienna, Austria

Artist: Rachel Whiteread, concrete and steel, 2000

Quoted from Wikipedia:
The outside surfaces of the volume are cast library shelves turned inside out. The spines of the books are facing inwards and are not visible, therefore the titles of the volumes are unknown and the content of the books remains unrevealed. The shelves of the memorial appear to hold endless copies of the same edition, which stand for the vast number of the victims, as well as the concept of Jews as “People of the Book.” The double doors are cast with the panels inside out, and have no doorknobs or handles. They suggest the possibility of coming and going, but do not open.

The memorial represents, in the style of Whiteread’s “empty spaces”… a cultural space of memory and loss created by the genocide of the European Jews. Through the emphasis of void and negative casting rather than positive form and material, it acts as a “counter monument” in this way opposite to the production through history of grandiose and triumphal monumental objects.

As a work of art, the memorial was not intended to be beautiful and as such it contrasts with much of the Baroque art and architecture of Vienna… There is an aspect of discomfort in the monument that was meant to provoke thought in the viewer through the memorial’s severe presence. It was intended to evoke the tragedy and brutality of the Holocaust and in the words of Simon Wiesenthal at the unveiling, “This monument shouldn’t be beautiful, It must hurt.”

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flickr pic originally uploaded by chad k

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flickr pic originally uploaded by mitue

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flickr pic originally uploaded by ShiftOperations

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flickr pic originally uploaded by Robert Scarth

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flickr pic originally uploaded by shlomp-a-plompa

St. Jerome the Priest


Flickr pic originally uploaded by Karon

Location: Sheridan Circle ( Massachusetts Ave. & 24th ), the Croatian Embassy, Washington D.C., USA

Sculptor: Ivan Mestrovic, bronze, 1954

From kittytours.org:
Jerome (341-420) was born in Stridon, Croatia and became a noted clerical scholar. He later moved to Bethlehem and wrote numerous commentaries on the Bible. He is credited with being the first to translate the Bible from Hebrew into Latin…This statue originally sat on the grounds of the Franciscan Abbey, but was moved to its present location in front of the Croatian Embassy after the dissolution of Yugoslavia and the creation of the Croatian state.

About Mestrovic (from wikipedia):
Ivan Meštrović was a Croatian sculptor…(He is said to) be the greatest sculptor of religious subject matter since the Renaissance, the first living person to have a one man show at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.

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flickr pic originally uploaded by brutality of permanence

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flickr pic originally uploaded by M.V.Jantzen

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flickr pic originally uploaded by docoleg

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photo originally uploaded for dcmemorials.com