Category Archives: Figurative Art

The Oblation


Originally uploaded by mpgambo

Location: University of the Philippines, across the Philippines

This post is a tribute to the University of the Philippines’ commemoration of its Centennial Year (1908-2008).

From wikipedia:
The Oblation is the iconic symbol of the University of the Philippines, represented by a man with arms wide-stretched and face facing up, symbolizing selfless offering of one’s self to his country…The (original) Oblation was made by Professor Guillermo E. Tolentino with the help of Anastacio T. Caedo, his student apprentice…. Several replicas of the Oblation were made for campuses of the University of the Philippines, some by national artist, Napoleon Abueva, and 2005 national artist nominee Glenn Bautista…

At the UP Diliman campus, Quezon City, Philippines (uploaded by Michael Tienzo)

Front view at the UP Cebu campus, Cebu, Philippines (uploaded by APO-Zeta Omega)

at the UP Mindanao campus, Mintal, Bago Oshiro, Davao City, Philippines (uploaded by barefoot cinderella)

At the UP Open University, Laguna, Philippines (uploaded by Al Librero)

photo sharing (respect artist's copyrights)

At the UP Visayas Campus, Iloilo City, Philippines (uploaded by IAMME00)

Back view at UP Diliman Campus, Quezon City, Philippines (uploaded by orangedroplet)

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Public Art at Christmas Time (Part 1)

Quoted from quotegarden.com

Instead of being a time of unusual behavior, Christmas is perhaps the only time in the year when people can obey their natural impulses and express their true sentiments without feeling self-conscious and, perhaps, foolish.  Christmas, in short, is about the only chance a man has to be himself. ~Francis C. Farley

[I]t is the one season of the year when we can lay aside all gnawing worry, indulge in sentiment without censure, assume the carefree faith of childhood, and just plain “have fun.”  Whether they call it Yuletide, Noel, Weinachten, or Christmas, people around the earth thirst for its refreshment as the desert traveller for the oasis. ~D.D. Monroe

Christmas, children, is not a date.  It is a state of mind. ~Mary Ellen Chase

Somehow, not only for Christmas
But all the long year through,
The joy that you give to others
Is the joy that comes back to you.
And the more you spend in blessing
The poor and lonely and sad,
The more of your heart’s possessing
Returns to you glad.

-John Greenleaf Whittier

We Heart Public Art wishes everyone a Merry Christmas and a Blessed New Year!

Bust of Dr. Lincoln Goodale (taken by jfsl3 in Columbus, Ohio, USA, 2005)

Statue of Captain James Cook (taken by werewegian in Yorkshire, UK, 2007)

Festive Hippo (taken by Helena Pugsley in Marwell Zoo,  Colden Common, UK, 2008)

A Statue in Savannah, Georgia (taken by jamieca, 2006)

Lion with a Wreath (taken by {elaine} in Chicago. USA, 2007)

Ibsen with a Santa Hat (taken by svanes, Grimstad, Norway, 2006)

An Angel with a Santa Hat (taken by kerryank in Adelaide, Australia, 2008)

Ice and Snow Sculptures (Part 2)

Quoted from wikipedia:

Sculpting ice presents a number of difficulties due to the variability and volatility of the material. Ice must be carefully selected to be suitable for the sculptor’s purposes and should be free of undesired impurities. Typically, ideal carving ice is made from pure, clean water. However, clear, transparent ice is a result of the freezing process and not necessarily related to the purity of the water. Clear ice is mostly the result of slow freezing that allows impurities to escape. The water molecules are allowed to line up into the typical crystal lattice while impurities remain in the unfrozen water. Certain machines and processes allow for slow freezing and the removal of impurities and therefore are able to produce the clear blocks of ice that are favored by ice carvers. However, not all blocks that are carved are clear ice. White ice blocks look like snow and are sometimes carved. Colored ice blocks are produced by adding dyes to the ice and can be carved as well. In some instances, clear ice and colored ice are combined to create a desired effect.

Frozen in thought: Ice sculpture entry for Zehnder’s Snowfest, Frankenmuth, Michigan USA (taken in Jan. 2008 by David :0)

Detail of ice sculpture of child: Halifax Ice Sculpture Trail, Nova Scotia, Canada (taken in Dec. 2008 by john2544)

Ice Queen: from Wereldwonderen, Netherlands (taken in Dec. 2007 by Eisbeertje)

Cold Icy Stare: Exposición de Esculturas de Hielo in Madrid, Spain (taken in Dec. 2007 by tonymadrid)

Royal Icy Treatment: Ice Sculpture Festival and Trail, Norwich, Norfolk, UK (taken in Dec. 2005 by Leo Reynolds)

Ice Fantasy: International Competition of Ice and Sculpture in Khabarovsk, Russia (taken in Jan. 2008 by smakogon)

Robert Frost


Originally uploaded by abbybatchelder

Location: copies of this statue are found across the USA particularly in university and college campuses

Sculpture by: George Lundeen, bronze

Quoted from the article “Behind the Bronze” in theclockonline:
“I was in that house [Robert Frost’s house in New Hampshire] and they have kind of a wooden easy chair there,” Lundeen explained. “There was a picture next to it of him (Frost) sitting in that chair.”
The inspiration for Plymouth’s statue and its 20 other copies scattered around the United States came from the “desk” that Frost had set up on the chair to write on.
“He put a board across the arms of the chair and there was a hole with a stick through it to keep it up,” Lundeen said. “What I did for the piece was use that board, propped up with that stick… I thought that it really worked well.”
A bronze statue made at life-size takes approximately a year to complete. Lundeen explained that for the first four to six months a clay piece, approximately the size of the final product is used to achieve a good overall appearance.
“When you see a life size piece like that, you need a good silhouette that will greet people,” Lundeen said.
From there it takes a month to develop the mold for the sculpture and another two or three months to cast and finish the artwork.

photo sharing (respect artists copyrights)

One statue in Plymouth State University (flickr pic originally uploaded by misterbisson)

flickr pic originally uploaded by Josh Fields (Plymouth State University)

This one is in Colorado University (flickr pic originally uploaded by Photoman Dan)…

….while this statue is in Dartmouth College (flickr pic originally uploaded by adam.riggall)

Detail shot originally uploaded by misterbisson

Nomade

Originally uploaded by marisa.landrigan

Location: Gateway Park, Des Moines, Iowa, USA

Sculpture by Jaume Plensa, stainless steel, 2007

Quoted from sculpture.net:
Venture capitalist and philanthropist John Pappajohn has purchased a 25-foot-tall sculpture by Spanish artist Jaume Plensa as the signature piece for the sculpture garden Pappajohn wants to create in Des Moines’ downtown Gateway Park.

The piece, titled “Nomade,” is being shipped to Iowa from Florida, where it appeared…in Art Basel Miami Beach, an international art show… The sculpture is made of randomly arranged stainless steel letters that are painted white and welded in the shape of a person sitting with knees drawn up to the chest with arms around the knees. The artist has said the shape was based on a position that his son sometimes assumes.

“It will be so interactive with people,” said City Councilwoman Chris Hensley. “You can go in and walk around inside the sculpture and sit inside it. The lighting will make it spectacular at night.”

Nomade is lighted from the ground inside the sculpture…causing the inside of the letters to reflect the white enamel paint and the outside to take on a ghostly, dark presence.

flickr pic originally uploaded by broox

flickr pic originally uploaded by Don3rdSE

flickr pic originally uploaded by Erin Go Braugh 84

flickr pic originally uploaded by mondolind

flickr pic originally uploaded by cwwycoff1

Aurora


Flickr pic originally uploaded

by Always_be_closing

Location: Crystal mall, Burnaby BC, Canada

Sculpture by: Colin Kwok, bronze

Quoted from geocities.com:
Trained as an architect but passionate as a bronze sculptor, Colin was trained at the Rhode Island School of Design: “We are primarily interested in Art that is still Art. You can pick it up and move it in a thousand years half way across the world and people can still appreciate it. This means that it is both specific to a purpose and that it has enough passion and depth to contain multiple meanings. Our strength is in finding and expressing the essence of a project while keeping all of this in mind. Our aspirations are to make Art that is about life.”

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flickr pic originally uploaded by Uncleweed

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Detail pic originally uploaded by shoutwithjoy

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flickr shot originally uploaded by SqueakyMarmot

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flickr shot originally uploaded by SqueakyMarmot

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Detail pic originally uploaded by shoutwithjoy

St. Jerome the Priest


Flickr pic originally uploaded by Karon

Location: Sheridan Circle ( Massachusetts Ave. & 24th ), the Croatian Embassy, Washington D.C., USA

Sculptor: Ivan Mestrovic, bronze, 1954

From kittytours.org:
Jerome (341-420) was born in Stridon, Croatia and became a noted clerical scholar. He later moved to Bethlehem and wrote numerous commentaries on the Bible. He is credited with being the first to translate the Bible from Hebrew into Latin…This statue originally sat on the grounds of the Franciscan Abbey, but was moved to its present location in front of the Croatian Embassy after the dissolution of Yugoslavia and the creation of the Croatian state.

About Mestrovic (from wikipedia):
Ivan Meštrović was a Croatian sculptor…(He is said to) be the greatest sculptor of religious subject matter since the Renaissance, the first living person to have a one man show at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City.

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flickr pic originally uploaded by brutality of permanence

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flickr pic originally uploaded by M.V.Jantzen

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flickr pic originally uploaded by docoleg

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photo originally uploaded for dcmemorials.com